We have recently been surprised by some expressions of animosity toward the Siskiyou Humane Society regarding the bill restricting the use of hounds in hunting for bear and bobcat.

Dear Editor,

We have recently been surprised by some expressions of animosity toward the Siskiyou Humane Society regarding the bill restricting the use of hounds in hunting for bear and bobcat.

We can only attribute this to confusion about the term “Humane Society.”   Humane Society or SPCA are generic words for many animal welfare organizations – it refers to us like “grocery store” refers to supermarkets.

Unlike grocery stores though, there are no “chains” of humane societies – each one in each city or town is an individual organization not affiliated with any other.

The three major national animal welfare organizations in the United States are the American Humane Association, the Humane Society of the United States and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty To Animals.

Only the ASPCA operates an animal shelter, the one in New York City featured in the TV show Animal Precinct. Otherwise, these national groups are advocacy and educational organizations that provide no funding and have no affiliation, supervision or control over local humane groups.

The Siskiyou Humane Society is a private 501(c)3 non-profit organization that has been serving the needs of homeless pets in Siskiyou County for over 40 years.

We are not affiliated with any national humane group, are not receiving funding from them, and have no input or participation in their political activities.

Our mission is to prevent pet over-population, protect, shelter and place animals in need – animals meaning domestic cats and dogs.

The bill restricting the use of hounds in hunting deals with wildlife issues that are entirely outside the bounds of our mission statement, and therefore Siskiyou Humane as an organization can have no position in the matter.

Individuals within our organization have a wide range of personal opinions and positions. We respect the diversity of each other’s opinions and the right of every individual to choose for themselves what works for them morally, ethically and personally in regards to responsible and legal participation in hunting and fishing.

Please don’t confuse us, the Siskiyou Humane Society in Mount Shasta, with any of the national humane organizations involved in the bill.

Kim Latos, manager, Siskiyou Humane Society