Ney Spring, discovered by John Ney in 1887, became a destination health resort based on the mineral waters there. At Faery Falls, Ney Springs Creek crashes nearly 60 feet down a granite cliff face, forming a clear pool at the bottom.

The Mt. Shasta Trail Association invites its members and the public to join in a two mile round-trip gentle hike, free of charge, scheduled for Saturday, May 4 to the historic Ney Springs resort site and Faery Falls.

Participants will meet at the fish hatchery parking lot at 9 a.m. to form carpools. Bring lunch and water and expect to return by 4 p.m.

Ney Spring was discovered by John Ney in 1887. It became a destination health resort based on the mineral waters there. The water has a ph of 11.6 and a silica content of 4,000 parts per million, the highest values known to occur in natural ground waters.

When the railroad first became operational, Ney Springs was one of several summer resorts that were popular with wealthy Bay Area residents who were drawn to healing spring waters. Other resorts included Shasta Springs, Upper Soda Springs, and Stewart Springs.

To get to Ney Springs, visitors would take the train to Cantara, then follow a trail upriver to the small gorge below Box Canyon where there was a bridge over the river (the abutments are still there).

The trail then followed the west side of the river to and up Ney Springs Creek to the resort. The trail was wide enough for carriages so that visitors could get a ride from the train.

The Ney Springs resort consisted of a hotel that housed 50 guests, a bath house and boardwalks that meandered through the wooded forest. There was also a carriage house, a barn and several piped spring enclosures.

All that can be found there now is some masonry foundations and a small trickling stream under the tall pines. It's a wonderful stretch of one's imagination to envision a lively resort at this now tranquil location.

A short walk upstream from the resort ruins leads to nearby Faery Falls, where Ney Springs Creek crashes nearly 60 feet down a granite cliff face, forming a clear pool at the bottom. It could be the tallest waterfall in Siskiyou County, and at this time of the year it will be running with a roar.

For those interested, a bonus two mile round-trip hike will go along the Box Canyon trail afterwards.

For more information call Joan Roemer, 926-0647.