A city crew was working Wednesday on replacing a section of plastic sewer pipe on the north side of Highway 97, near the CAL FIRE station.

City of Weed Public Works Director Craig Sharp said Wednesday morning that there is no more danger of sewage water going into Boles Creek following last night’s leak.

He said the release of an estimated 10,000 gallons of water waste was caused by a blockage in a section of pipe that initially caused untreated liquid to back up and escape through a manhole cover.

The city worked to get it fixed for much of the day Tuesday, and it finally broke loose about 8:30 p.m.

A city crew was working Wednesday on replacing a section of plastic pipe on the north side of Highway 97, near the CAL FIRE station.

Sharp said the replacement pipe will be bigger and better than what was there.

He said dealing with blockages is common, but it normally doesn’t happen in one of the main arteries to the treatment plant.

He said he believes that any of the liquid that may have reached Lake Shastina via Boles Creek would have been greatly diluted.

Sewage line blockages, according to Sharp, are usually caused by a combination of stuff that gets dumped down drains and flushed from toilets as well as tree roots. He said household grease can collect on the inside of pipes and products that don’t break down, like baby wipes, are often involved.

The Siskiyou County Office of Emergency put out a warning Tuesday night regarding the leak and encouraging anyone who may have become ill from contact with the water to call 911 immediately.

-- This article is corrected to clarify Sharp said he believes any of the liquid that may have reached Lake Shastina via Boles Creek would have been greatly diluted. It previously incorrectly had Lake Siskiyou.