Pico de Gallo or fresh salsa is one of those simple recipes that is easy to make and provides great rewards. This garden crispy mixture adds a fresh colorful texture to most Mexican dishes, eggs, meats, and even salads.  Pico de Gallo is perfect on crunchy salty corn tortilla chip. It's good on a scoop of cottage cheese, too. The recipe is so easy, just chop  the four fresh ingredients then, add lime juice with a sprinkle of salt.

Picco de Gallo is a mildly spicy fresh condiment that is the colors of the Mexican Flag.

Pico de Gallo Recipe

Ingredients

Tomatoes - chopped
Onion - chopped -  a white or yellow onion
Chiles - chopped - remove seed  - I use jalapenos
Cilantro - chop one bunch
Lime - Juice
Salt - to taste

Directions
I use a ratio of 3 part tomatoes, 1 part onion to 1 bunch cilantro, 1 or 2 jalapenos.  Place all chopped ingredients in a bowl and toss. Taste and adjust ingredients for flavor.  Serve right away or store in refrigerator up to a week.

Tasting is the fun part - Taste it asking yourself, are there too many onions, not enough cilantro, does it need a little more tomato, or it's just right? Have you achieved a a balanced of flavor and spice? Adjust the Pico de Gallo to your taste.

Fresh spicy Pico de Gallo on a crispy salty tortilla chip is a perfect snack.

Tips & Subsitutes

Chiles - I use jalapeno chili. I like the nice plump green ones. When shopping you might see some jalapeno's that have started to turn red, those are older and probably hotter...that might be what you are looking for. Taste your jalapeno's so you have a sense of the heat level your are dealing with before you add them to the salsa.  It is only by tasting that you know how to adjust the fresh salsa to your taste. The is no need to remove seed from mild jalapeno.

This isn't meant to be a killer hot salsa, but if you like the Pico de Gallo spicier,  add a Serrano chile or other spicier varieties.

Food Processor - I have made this salsa in a food processor. Chop the onions first pulsing just a few times until the onion is chopped, but still in fairly large pieces. The add peppers and cilantro for a few pulses. Finally adding the tomatoes and pulse until you've attended the chopped size you prefer. Then add the salt and lime juice.

Pico de Gallo in a beautiful handmade salsa dish I bought in Truchas, New Mexico 'on the high road'  from Santa Fe to Taos. Also where they filmed  The Milagro Beanfield War , one of my all time favorites.

Epicurious Magazine gives this backstory: "The Spanish name for this salsa means "rooster's beak," and originally referred to a salad of jicama, peanuts, oranges, and onions. But today, whether you're in Minneapolis or Mexico City, if you ask for pico de gallo, you'll get the familiar cilantro-flecked combination of chopped tomato, onion, and fresh chiles. This tart, crisp condiment (also known as salsa Mexicana) has become so common on Mexican tables that it seems like no coincidence that its colors match those of the national flag. Besides finding firm ripe tomatoes and seeding them, the key to this salsa is adding plenty of lime juice and salt, and not skimping on the chiles. Because without a burst of acidity and heat, you're just eating chopped tomatoes."

 

 

 

Pico de Gallo or fresh salsa is one of those simple recipes that is easy to make and provides great rewards. This garden crispy mixture adds a fresh colorful texture to most Mexican dishes, eggs, meats, and even salads.  Pico de Gallo is perfect on crunchy salty corn tortilla chip. It's good on a scoop of cottage cheese, too. The recipe is so easy, just chop  the four fresh ingredients then, add lime juice with a sprinkle of salt.

Picco de Gallo is a mildly spicy fresh condiment that is the colors of the Mexican Flag.

Pico de Gallo Recipe

Ingredients

Tomatoes - chopped
Onion - chopped -  a white or yellow onion
Chiles - chopped - remove seed  - I use jalapenos
Cilantro - chop one bunch
Lime - Juice
Salt - to taste

Directions
I use a ratio of 3 part tomatoes, 1 part onion to 1 bunch cilantro, 1 or 2 jalapenos.  Place all chopped ingredients in a bowl and toss. Taste and adjust ingredients for flavor.  Serve right away or store in refrigerator up to a week.

Tasting is the fun part - Taste it asking yourself, are there too many onions, not enough cilantro, does it need a little more tomato, or it's just right? Have you achieved a a balanced of flavor and spice? Adjust the Pico de Gallo to your taste.

Fresh spicy Pico de Gallo on a crispy salty tortilla chip is a perfect snack.

Tips & Subsitutes

Chiles - I use jalapeno chili. I like the nice plump green ones. When shopping you might see some jalapeno's that have started to turn red, those are older and probably hotter...that might be what you are looking for. Taste your jalapeno's so you have a sense of the heat level your are dealing with before you add them to the salsa.  It is only by tasting that you know how to adjust the fresh salsa to your taste. The is no need to remove seed from mild jalapeno.

This isn't meant to be a killer hot salsa, but if you like the Pico de Gallo spicier,  add a Serrano chile or other spicier varieties.

Food Processor - I have made this salsa in a food processor. Chop the onions first pulsing just a few times until the onion is chopped, but still in fairly large pieces. The add peppers and cilantro for a few pulses. Finally adding the tomatoes and pulse until you've attended the chopped size you prefer. Then add the salt and lime juice.

Pico de Gallo in a beautiful handmade salsa dish I bought in Truchas, New Mexico 'on the high road'  from Santa Fe to Taos. Also where they filmed  The Milagro Beanfield War , one of my all time favorites.

Epicurious Magazine gives this backstory: "The Spanish name for this salsa means "rooster's beak," and originally referred to a salad of jicama, peanuts, oranges, and onions. But today, whether you're in Minneapolis or Mexico City, if you ask for pico de gallo, you'll get the familiar cilantro-flecked combination of chopped tomato, onion, and fresh chiles. This tart, crisp condiment (also known as salsa Mexicana) has become so common on Mexican tables that it seems like no coincidence that its colors match those of the national flag. Besides finding firm ripe tomatoes and seeding them, the key to this salsa is adding plenty of lime juice and salt, and not skimping on the chiles. Because without a burst of acidity and heat, you're just eating chopped tomatoes."