By Siskiyou Land Trust
You may have heard a little bit about the Upper Sacramento Integrated Regional Water Management Plan. For the past two years, the River Exchange has conducted a tireless effort to gather local stakeholders, develop a forum for these stakeholders to contribute their knowledge and efforts, and write the plan.
Throughout these two years, a wide diversity of stakeholders have recognized the need to communicate our water needs and collaboratively develop solutions so that when we do have drought, or water demand rises, we can meet those needs without sacrificing other objectives.
Cities and towns, local indigenous tribes and grassroots groups are put their heads together for this effort and continue to work with each other in developing projects to reach our mutually held objectives, as outlined in the plan. Among the participants is us, the Siskiyou Land Trust.
SLT is a 5013 non-profit dedicated to protecting open space, ranch and farmlands, forest and wetlands, natural resources and wildlife habitat in beautiful Siskiyou County. We help make it possible for private land owners to conserve their open spaces and reduce pressures to subdivide or develop through conservation easements, acquisitions, and joint greenway projects.
So why would SLT be interested in participating in the IRWM Plan? There are a few good reasons for why we are proud to participate and excited about the possibilities of collaboration:
1) As a landowner: SLT owns and manages property in the Upper Sacramento watershed and we are directly impacted when we face drought or over extraction.
The Sisson Meadow and Garden Greenways properties are publically accessible and enjoyed by many, but they require maintenance. By working through the IRWM Plan, we can solicit technical advice, comments and potentially even funding when we put forth projects to restore and care for these lands.
2) As a Land Trust: One of the most important questions a Land Trust must ask itself is about where they should be focusing their limited time and resources.
With a limited staff, SLT needs to concentrate on those conservation easement projects that will have the greatest benefits to all objectives water resources, wildlife and protection of working landscapes.
The IRWM Plan provides a link between the work we do in land conservation and stewardship and the water resources of the Upper Sacramento and may help SLT identify priorities in the watershed.
3) As a facilitator: SLT is an apolitical, member funded, non-profit organization meaning that the work we do is done relying entirely on interested landowners, volunteers and the community.
However, we recognize that there are many different perspectives and opinions on how to meet the challenges we face in sustainably managing and utilizing our water resources. The IRWM is an excellent forum where those challenges and opinions can be aired and discussed.
As a member of the IRWM, SLT has the opportunity to offer technical advice and facilitate conversations as we find common ground between our various groups. The IRWM serves as meeting point where members, including SLT, can develop and strengthen partnerships to reach mutually shared objectives.
Shasta Commons is a network organization whose mission is to encourage a resilient and thriving local community. They are overseeing the Community Sustainability column in Mt. Shasta Area Newspapers. For more information visit: mountshastacommons.org/

By Siskiyou Land Trust You may have heard a little bit about the Upper Sacramento Integrated Regional Water Management Plan. For the past two years, the River Exchange has conducted a tireless effort to gather local stakeholders, develop a forum for these stakeholders to contribute their knowledge and efforts, and write the plan. Throughout these two years, a wide diversity of stakeholders have recognized the need to communicate our water needs and collaboratively develop solutions so that when we do have drought, or water demand rises, we can meet those needs without sacrificing other objectives. Cities and towns, local indigenous tribes and grassroots groups are put their heads together for this effort and continue to work with each other in developing projects to reach our mutually held objectives, as outlined in the plan. Among the participants is us, the Siskiyou Land Trust. SLT is a 5013 non-profit dedicated to protecting open space, ranch and farmlands, forest and wetlands, natural resources and wildlife habitat in beautiful Siskiyou County. We help make it possible for private land owners to conserve their open spaces and reduce pressures to subdivide or develop through conservation easements, acquisitions, and joint greenway projects. So why would SLT be interested in participating in the IRWM Plan? There are a few good reasons for why we are proud to participate and excited about the possibilities of collaboration: 1) As a landowner: SLT owns and manages property in the Upper Sacramento watershed and we are directly impacted when we face drought or over extraction. The Sisson Meadow and Garden Greenways properties are publically accessible and enjoyed by many, but they require maintenance. By working through the IRWM Plan, we can solicit technical advice, comments and potentially even funding when we put forth projects to restore and care for these lands. 2) As a Land Trust: One of the most important questions a Land Trust must ask itself is about where they should be focusing their limited time and resources. With a limited staff, SLT needs to concentrate on those conservation easement projects that will have the greatest benefits to all objectives water resources, wildlife and protection of working landscapes. The IRWM Plan provides a link between the work we do in land conservation and stewardship and the water resources of the Upper Sacramento and may help SLT identify priorities in the watershed. 3) As a facilitator: SLT is an apolitical, member funded, non-profit organization meaning that the work we do is done relying entirely on interested landowners, volunteers and the community. However, we recognize that there are many different perspectives and opinions on how to meet the challenges we face in sustainably managing and utilizing our water resources. The IRWM is an excellent forum where those challenges and opinions can be aired and discussed. As a member of the IRWM, SLT has the opportunity to offer technical advice and facilitate conversations as we find common ground between our various groups. The IRWM serves as meeting point where members, including SLT, can develop and strengthen partnerships to reach mutually shared objectives. Shasta Commons is a network organization whose mission is to encourage a resilient and thriving local community. They are overseeing the Community Sustainability column in Mt. Shasta Area Newspapers. For more information visit: mountshastacommons.org/