Siskiyou Union High School District trustees renewed contracts last week with Mount Shasta High School principal Jennifer McKinnon and McCloud and Jefferson High School principal Ed Stokes to continue in their roles as associate superintendents.

Siskiyou Union High School District trustees renewed contracts last week with Mount Shasta High School principal Jennifer McKinnon and McCloud and Jefferson High School principal Ed Stokes to continue in their roles as associate superintendents.

Maintaining the administrative structure of three superintendents sharing the district’s workload while remaining principals at the schools was approved during the board’s May meeting, said superintendent and Weed High School principal Mike Matheson.

The vote at that time was 5-2, with trustees Jana Blevins and Lori Harch dissenting, and Margaret DeBortoli, John Hines, Gregg Gunkel, Jay Clark, and Sue Tavalero voting to approve.

The reorganized structure, which went into place last year, saves the district more than $100,000 annually, said Matheson.

Blevins said many of the teachers and staff don’t approve of the structure and urged a district-wide survey be conducted to get input. She said the survey was a caveat from the original approval of the reorganization in July of 2012, which was approved 5-1, with former trustee Linda Wallace casting the sole dissenting vote. She cited a desire to see more funds go to teachers.

Budget ‘improving’

During the District’s June 25 meeting, trustees approved a budget for the 2014-2015 school year and the first Local Control Accountability Plan, which each California school district must write to explain its goals and strategies for improving achievement for all students.

The budget picture, overall, is “improving,” Matheson said, and the District was able to build in a two percent offer for certificated and classified staff.

Under the new Local Control Funding Formula, which is now in its second year, schools receive per-pupil base grants which are used to support the basic costs of instruction and operations.

Supplemental grants are given to schools based on their demographics. For instance, schools with more English learners, foster children or economically disadvantaged students receive extra funding from the state.

Under the plan, SUHSD is receiving more money per student than they have in the past five years, but as that amount increases, enrollment is dropping, Matheson said.

“Unless something happens with enrollment at our local elementary schools, we are projecting declining enrollment into the future,” Matheson said.

McCloud High School will remain open next year using Necessary Small School funding, Matheson said. Weed and Happy Camp high schools also use the Necessary Small School formula.