I don’t know of any polls on this matter, but I suspect that many Americans think there ought to be laws against the use of provably false claims in election campaigns.


Well, there is (or was) just such a law in Ohio, but it’s met the fate it deserves, as we see HERE:


A federal judge has struck down an Ohio state law that allows the government to regulate political falsehoods.


In a Thursday decision, U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Black sided with the pro-life group Susan B. Anthony List against the Ohio Elections Commission in a lawsuit over the commission’s right to regulate and censor political speech that it deems false.


“We do not want the government (i.e., the Ohio Elections Commission) deciding what is political truth — for fear that the government might persecute those who criticize it. Instead, in a democracy, the voters should decide,” Black wrote in a decision that orders the state to stop enforcing its falsehood law…


The case arises out of a dispute during the 2010 election where SBA List wanted to run political ads against then-Rep. Steven Driehaus (D-Ohio) accusing him of voting in favor of taxpayer-funded abortions by supporting Obama’s health care law, now commonly called Obamacare.


Driehaus filed a complaint over the ad campaign with the Ohio Elections Commission, arguing that SBA List’s billboard ad was in violation of the Ohio false political statement law.


SBA List strongly denied that its ads were false but filed a constitutional challenge on First Amendment grounds, arguing that the government had no right to determine the truth or falsehood of political ads and that Ohio’s law had a chilling effect on speech.


 


 


 

I don’t know of any polls on this matter, but I suspect that many Americans think there ought to be laws against the use of provably false claims in election campaigns.

Well, there is (or was) just such a law in Ohio, but it’s met the fate it deserves, as we see HERE:

A federal judge has struck down an Ohio state law that allows the government to regulate political falsehoods.

In a Thursday decision, U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Black sided with the pro-life group Susan B. Anthony List against the Ohio Elections Commission in a lawsuit over the commission’s right to regulate and censor political speech that it deems false.

“We do not want the government (i.e., the Ohio Elections Commission) deciding what is political truth — for fear that the government might persecute those who criticize it. Instead, in a democracy, the voters should decide,” Black wrote in a decision that orders the state to stop enforcing its falsehood law…

The case arises out of a dispute during the 2010 election where SBA List wanted to run political ads against then-Rep. Steven Driehaus (D-Ohio) accusing him of voting in favor of taxpayer-funded abortions by supporting Obama’s health care law, now commonly called Obamacare.

Driehaus filed a complaint over the ad campaign with the Ohio Elections Commission, arguing that SBA List’s billboard ad was in violation of the Ohio false political statement law.

SBA List strongly denied that its ads were false but filed a constitutional challenge on First Amendment grounds, arguing that the government had no right to determine the truth or falsehood of political ads and that Ohio’s law had a chilling effect on speech.