By Sarah Alexander
A collective sigh of relief seemed to go up from folks and forest alike at the first soaking rain in late September. It was a much needed balm following months of drought and raging, destructive fires. Seeing Mount Shasta dressed in her white beauty – if only for a few days – gave us a glimmer of hope and uplifted our spirits. Rain sweet rain! May this gentle drenching be a glimpse of the Winter ahead, bringing us precipitation enough to replenish our reservoirs, raise the groundwater level, and soothe the crackling dry forests and parched fields.
Water... precious water.
In June I received a letter from the Weed water district calling for a voluntary 20% reduction in our water use given the severe drought conditions.
The letter listed some practical suggestions for adapting our water use habits to drought mode.
On the back (nice detail, conserving paper!) was a list showing gallons of water typically used by households for showering, washing dishes, flushing, and so forth. I was surprised (okay, a bit shocked) at the levels of usage as they seemed high to me. I started monitoring my own use. Although I came in much lower on most usages, I was about the same on others.
Determined to further reduce my already thrifty water use, I started paying closer attention. I have long had bins in the kitchen sink that I water some plants with from the gray-water. A friend puts a bucket in the shower to catch the first cold water and the shower splash for watering plants. I copied that, and now I use that bucket to flush the toilet. Works like a charm!
I have a feeling many of us have gotten creative with recycling and reducing our water use. Surely we've all been doing what we can to conserve water in this intense drought.
Let’s gather to share our conservation habits, tricks, and methods, as well as to learn from each other what more we could be incorporating into our daily conservation practices. On Thursday Oct. 16 at 5:15 p.m., let’s come together at the City Park Headwaters to sit in circle and ‘pray rain’! Contact: Sarah 925-6260.

By Sarah Alexander A collective sigh of relief seemed to go up from folks and forest alike at the first soaking rain in late September. It was a much needed balm following months of drought and raging, destructive fires. Seeing Mount Shasta dressed in her white beauty – if only for a few days – gave us a glimmer of hope and uplifted our spirits. Rain sweet rain! May this gentle drenching be a glimpse of the Winter ahead, bringing us precipitation enough to replenish our reservoirs, raise the groundwater level, and soothe the crackling dry forests and parched fields. Water... precious water. In June I received a letter from the Weed water district calling for a voluntary 20% reduction in our water use given the severe drought conditions. The letter listed some practical suggestions for adapting our water use habits to drought mode. On the back (nice detail, conserving paper!) was a list showing gallons of water typically used by households for showering, washing dishes, flushing, and so forth. I was surprised (okay, a bit shocked) at the levels of usage as they seemed high to me. I started monitoring my own use. Although I came in much lower on most usages, I was about the same on others. Determined to further reduce my already thrifty water use, I started paying closer attention. I have long had bins in the kitchen sink that I water some plants with from the gray-water. A friend puts a bucket in the shower to catch the first cold water and the shower splash for watering plants. I copied that, and now I use that bucket to flush the toilet. Works like a charm! I have a feeling many of us have gotten creative with recycling and reducing our water use. Surely we've all been doing what we can to conserve water in this intense drought. Let’s gather to share our conservation habits, tricks, and methods, as well as to learn from each other what more we could be incorporating into our daily conservation practices. On Thursday Oct. 16 at 5:15 p.m., let’s come together at the City Park Headwaters to sit in circle and ‘pray rain’! Contact: Sarah 925-6260.