Before diving into an agenda comprised mostly of new ordinances designed to alleviate negative issues related to the transient situation in Mount Shasta, the city council took a few minutes to honor the city's police officers during their regular meeting Monday, May

Before diving into an agenda comprised mostly of new ordinances designed to alleviate negative issues related to the transient situation in Mount Shasta, the city council took a few minutes to honor the city’s police officers during their regular meeting Monday, May 11.

“We are giving a proclamation of honor this evening in the city of Mount Shasta, California to recognize national police week, 2015,” said Mayor Geoff Harkness. He saluted the service of police officers in the community of Mount Shasta and across the nation.

Police chief Parish Cross spoke briefly after the proclamation, saying, “This is a very welcome pat on the back. We’re honest. We’re a fair department, and I hope that we’ll continue to be that type of department.”

Council unanimously passed a resolution to sponsor the application to the Caltrans Active Transportation Program for the funding of a bike trail presented by Tuli Potts and Justi Hansen at the previous city council meeting on April 27. The trail will be approximately 30 miles long and will connect the city of Mount Shasta to the Ski Park. It’s the first phase in a larger trail construction project that is being proposed to connect Mount Shasta to the neighboring cities of Weed and Dunsmuir.

The project is being run by local trail organizations, but requires the city’s sponsorship in order to apply for ATP funding.

Potts explained that the project was scaled down from the original presentation two weeks ago due to the rapidly approaching grant deadline on June 1.

Council unanimously approved the first readings of five new city ordinances that were created with the intention to reduce unpleasant interactions with the transient population.

One prohibits any person from sitting or lying down on public property, with exceptions for medical emergency, using a wheelchair or similar device, patronizing an establishment that provides benches, sitting on a bench at bus stops and public plazas, and participating in or viewing special events.

One would prohibit individuals from smoking marijuana in any public place within the city limits, even if they are in possession of a medical recommendation.

Lieutenant Joe Restine said this ordinance would still prohibit public smoking of marijuana within the city even if the state of California legalizes recreational use. He added that they are hoping to create a separate ordinance for smoking tobacco.

A third ordinance, according Restine, is intended to target individuals who hang out on sidewalks in the downtown area with alcoholic beverages in brown bags, as it is linked to inappropriate behavior. Drinking alcohol in public will still be allowed at special events and in parks.

Another ordinance requires dogs to be leashed, with the other end of the leash in the hand of a person who is responsible for the dog. Dogs that get tied up and left unattended can be taken into custody by the police, who will use their discretion to determine if the dog needs to be removed. Groups of dogs exhibiting aggressive behavior are also prohibited. Additionally, all dogs need to be vaccinated and licensed.

Eckert said those who break the ordinances will receive a warning, followed by a $100 fine that will increase with repeat offenses.

The final ordinance discussed at the meeting establishes that Parker Plaza will be managed by the city of Mount Shasta.

Reporting on outside meetings, Harkness said the regional water management group met April 30, and introduced four new projects. Two that were considered priority level one are: replacement of tank 1 and the Big Lakes water distribution improvement project. Two adopted as level two priority, meaning that the project or application is not complete, are the interceptor line replacement project and the placement of a well and tank on Spring Hill.