CLEVELAND — Roberto Perez did the trotting, Francisco Lindor did the dancing and Cleveland did the partying.

Perez’ two-out, three-run Robo-Bomb to left field in the bottom of the eighth inning — his second home run of the night — was the Red Rider BB gun on what amounted to Christmas in Cleveland on Tuesday night.

That homer stretched the Indians’ lead to 6-0, a lead that held up to give the Indians a 1-0 World Series lead over the Chicago Cubs on the same night the Cleveland Cavaliers received their NBA championship rings next door.

“What he did at the plate tonight, my goodness,” Indians manager Terry Francona said of Perez. “It’s exciting to watch. He gave us a cushion early and late.”

Perez had just three home runs in 153 at-bats in the regular season, but he now has three homers in 27 postseason at-bats after hitting a laser into the left-field railing in the third inning that made it 3-0.

His eighth-inning homer was more dramatic, as the 38,091 fans inside Progressive Field and thousands more beyond the left field porch started dancing like it was ... well, four months ago. Lindor did, too, dancing up and down in front of the dugout as Perez rounded the bases.

“I’ve never had a night like that,” Perez said. “After the first AB (when he flied out), I just wanted to get that out of the way. I think I was swinging too hard and … I just needed to trust myself.

“After that, I was trying to be myself. Put the ball in play and I finally hit two mistakes. I mean, I just couldn’t believe it.”

Not bad for a No. 9 hitter whose hitting was so suspect, the Indians tried to trade for then-Brewers catcher Jonathan Lucroy in July. Lucroy vetoed the trade and ultimately went to Texas, where his Rangers got swept out of the first round of the playoffs.

Perez entered Tuesday’s game just 4-for-23 in the postseason, but became the latest unsung hero in a season filled with them. He’s also the only Indian ever to hit two home runs in a World Series game.

“I’ve come a long ways,” Perez said. “I’m just playing with a lot of confidence right now. I’m not trying to do too much at the plate. Just trying to control my emotions. It’s my first World Series experience and I’m just trying to go up there and … make something happen.”

Oh yeah, he also did a pretty nice job behind the plate, too, guiding three pitchers to the first Game 1 shutout in a World Series since 1990, when the Cincinnati Reds did it.

“He did an unbelievable job,” Indians starter Corey Kluber said. “It’s almost like he knew what they (the Cubs) were looking for. He had them off-balance the majority of the night. The only time they got hits was when I didn’t execute my pitches.

“I did what he asked me to and it worked pretty well.”

— You can reach Joe at joe.scalzo@cantonrep.com or on Twitter @jscalzoREP