The Shasta Historical Society will be hosting a viewing of the award winning documentary “From the Quarters to Lincoln Heights,” followed by an open discussion led by director/producer Mark Oliver.

The film, created by Oliver and James Langford, tells the story of how a large African-American population came to be rooted in the towns of Weed, McCloud and Mount Shasta. It will be shown free of charge Saturday, Jan. 28, at 1:30 p.m. at IOOF Hall on Butte St. in downtown Redding.

From the Quarters to Lincoln Heights explores how communities of African Americans thrived in multi-racial rural lumber towns. Featuring more than 60 interviews, the documentary reveals the early inter-racial relationships that existed in northern California and gives a voice to many African Americans who lived and worked in southern Siskiyou County, according to a press release.

Mark Oliver is an artist and filmmaker who has been making films for more than 20 years. A graduate from University of California San Diego, his films and videos move between narrative and experimental projects. Oliver has received grants and awards for his films and videos.

He finished From the Quarters to Lincoln Heights, his fourth documentary, in 2011.

His films and video installations have been exhibited in the US and abroad, some venues including San Diego Black Film Festival, Los Angeles Film Festival, ART CONCEPT, St. Petersburg, Russia, Instituto de America, Santa Fe, Spain, Cold Creation, Barcelona, Spain, TNT, Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, CA, Tekfest, Rome Italy, Museum of Fine Art, Santa Fe, NM, American Center, Paris, France.

The Shasta Historical Society was formed in 1930 and now serves as the largest non-university center for historical research in California north of Sacramento. Its vision is: “To build a shared community legacy for the future by preserving our past.” Its mission is: “To actively preserve, promote, and bring to life the history of Shasta County.”

For more information about the Shasta Historical Society, visit shastahistorical.org.