The change was made to ensure items on the agenda can be accomplished in a timely manner, and to and to make sure that citizens’ comments were heard with restrictions to how long a member of the public could speak.

Last week’s Dunsmuir City Council meeting was a send off for City Manager Mark Brannigan, who served the city of Dunsmuir for two years. Also at the April 18 meeting, council adopted protocols involving how to handle public comments.

The change was made to ensure items on the agenda can be accomplished in a timely manner, and to and to make sure that citizens’ comments were heard with restrictions to how long a member of the public could speak.

The protocols establish an effective environment for communication while maintaining leadership, according to the agenda.

“It is important to make this public friendly,” said councilor Peter Arth. “We have come so far ... but let’s make each citizen feel they are included. It is a good thing that reflects well on all of us.”

Councilor Dave Keisler made a motion to adopt the protocols and the resolution unanimously passed.

Brannigan resigns, interim manager selected

Brannigan gave the city his letter of resignation earlier this year, and he admitted at past meetings that he really did not want to leave but had to because of “personal reasons.”

“Thank you Mark, we really appreciate the funding for Butterfly Bridge, and we wish you well with your retirement,” said mayor Juliana Lucchesi. “Thank you for finding funding to help with our infrastructure.”

Councilor Bruce Deutsch also thanked Brannigan for his service. He stated that the council would remember Brannigan always, and he was able to help launch the city into the future.

“I want to thank the city council for the opportunity to be here and provide a service to the city,” Brannigan said. “It has been truly a pleasure for me and very rewarding. [Dunsmuir] is a wonderful place, and I wish you the best; I want to thank the community as well.”

A short recess took place during the middle of the meeting in which a chocolate cake complete with raspberries was enjoyed by those in attendance.

According to the agenda packet provided during the meeting, the city received seven applications for the city manager position. Since the city council is still deciding upon who shall fill the role, an interim city manager is needed.

Brannigan asked the city council to authorize Lucchesi to allow the city to enter an at-will interim city manager contract with Randy Johnsen. Johnsen filled in for this position for the city in the past.

“We realized with Mark leaving today that we needed someone to come in and work in this administrative position,” said Lucchesi. “Randy has done it in the past, so the contract has already been written.”

It was noted that Johnsen spoke with the city’s attorney, who assured the city that Johnsen agreed to the terms stated in the contract.

This contract was the same contract that Johnsen entered into when he helped the city in the past with this same position. However, Johnsen said that he would be in need of housing.

Deutsch noted that Johnsen and his wife needed a place to live after being displaced by the Paradise, California fire last year, which made this interim position an even better fit.

Keisler made a motion to authorize a contract with Johnsen as interim city manager. In a roll call vote, Lucchesi, council member Matthew Bryan, Keisler, and Deutsch voted yay. Councilor Peter Arth abstained.

This item did have a fiscal impact on the city that was not budgeted. A budget adjustment was needed in order to adhere to this action item, which affected the general fund, water fund, and sewer fund, along with other areas of the budget.

Committee decommissioned

In other action, Brannigan asked the council to decommission the Wastewater and Solid Waste Rate Study Committee. The committee was originally formed on January 18, 2018 when staff from the city asked the council to find citizens to serve on the committee.

This committee spent time with the city engineer to devise rate studies on solid waste and wastewater and is no longer needed. The council unanimously voted in favor of the decommission, which carried no fiscal impact.