Larson is the featured artist in Thornton Tomasetti’s quarterly networking event/art exhibit, held in their beautiful light filled space on the 14th floor, overlooking Coit Tower and China Town.

Siskiyou County painter Eloise Larson is exhibiting ‘Experiences of Vision’ in San Francisco at the private corporate gallery of Thornton Tomasetti, one of the nation’s major architectural engineering firms.

Larson is the featured artist in Thornton Tomasetti’s quarterly networking event/art exhibit, held in their beautiful light filled space on the 14th floor, overlooking Coit Tower and China Town.

Since 2014, Thornton Tomasetti has held quarterly art exhibit openings in conjunction with in-house networking cocktail hour get togethers. These gatherings are popular and well attended by the sharpest minds in the city – and plenty of art has been sold.

After a thoughtful introduction by one of the coordinators, Eloise described her exhibit in terms of a sort of intellectual interplay, and it was perfectly relatable to the linear thinkers in attendance standing in rapt attention (Later, a tardy arrival declared, “It is very evident the work is spiritual.”)

Amazingly, not a single image is representational of anything “spiritual,” yet every person in the room knew that what she was talking about was that inner eye within us, which notices the little things of beauty passing through our field of vision throughout our days – when we say to ourselves, “yes.” This is Larson’s work – a quiet yes to everything.

Larson is a long time presence in Siskiyou County and has painted here for many years. What many do not know is that Larson is also a member of the “Fairbanks Group,” where she painted beside Alfred Skondovitch of the famed American School. A step away, once removed from the greatest masters in modern art.

Her work in abstraction is important not just because of Larson’s advanced technical skill, but because she is a footnote in history.

Her show at Thornton Tomasetti, which runs through June 30, is important for two reasons. First and foremost, Larson is an intimate artist and a master colorist and portraitist. Technically, she has it all and one may have to board a flight to find a better colorist. Her dripping technique is there, more refined than earlier pieces. Her abstracts including two from her ocean series are foundational in their strength.

She will tell you her painting is not a spiritual journey and that she desires to paint what she wants, and to share her experiences. I am not so certain I would let her get away with a brush off, but you should decide for yourself.

Like a writer who creates fiction from pieces of memory, Larson’s work is daydream fodder, or night dream pigment. I can almost remember scenes from Larson’s abstractions but I wasn’t there.

Larson renounces territory very willingly, which is also a reflection of her Buddhist practice. She will refuse to own any of it. In her work is luminance, movement, abstraction.

What can be said is this: unlike many abstract works, Eloise Larson’s work leaves you filled up instead of hollowed out from trying. The energy is there, and it reverberated among the opening attendees.

For artists living remotely, Larson’s exhibit at Thornton Tomasetti may serve as inspiration to get busy cultivating corporate support. Thornton Tomasetti is among the top engineering firms in the world, building corporate structures, public projects, and structures dominating the skylines across the globe. They also finish those buildings and furnish them with art. Since starting quarterly art openings, Thornton Tomasetti exhibitors have sold over $20,000 in art and made many connections.

Larson will exhibit at Siskiyou Art Museum in November alongside encaustic artist Cathy Valentine of Mount Shasta. She is represented by Dabb Art in Los Angeles and is also on Artsy.

Visit her at www.eloiselarson.com/Thornton Tomasetti or www.thorntontomasetti.com/ and they’re located at 650 California Street, San Francisco, CA 415.365.6900).

• Patti David writes about art and history.