In honor of the 50-Year Anniversary of the building of Box Canyon Dam, Tom Hesseldenz will hold a presentation about the future of Lake Siskiyou on Thursday, July 25, at 7 p.m. at Mt. Shasta Sisson Museum.

In honor of the 50-Year Anniversary of the building of Box Canyon Dam, Tom Hesseldenz will hold a presentation about the future of Lake Siskiyou on Thursday, July 25, at 7 p.m. at Mt. Shasta Sisson Museum.

Hesseldenz has been involved with Lake Siskiyou for many years and has seen it go through many changes.

“I began swimming at the lake in 1978 and would occasionally run around the lake before there was a trail. This inspired us to construct a trail around the lake. Working on the trail project led to consideration of a number of related issues, including roads and parking areas, meadow and forest restoration, keeping the lake full, and addressing the filling-in of the lake by sediment at the Delta.”

Believing in Lake Siskiyou’s benefits as a recreational and economic resource, Hesseldenz hopes that, “people will come away from the presentation with a better understanding of the various issues and opportunities facing Lake Siskiyou. With strong community involvement, the lake will become an even better recreational and economic resource, and will benefit our county for many years to come. If we don’t deal with the various issues currently facing the lake, however, it will fall short of its full potential and potentially pose ever-increasing management problems as use increases and the lake environment deteriorates.”

Hesseldenz has a wide range of expertise in understanding possible problems and solutions that face the managers of Lake Siskiyou. He is a California-licensed landscape architect with a background in biology and natural resources planning. His niche involves design and planning solutions that better integrate people and nature. Some of his projects include parks, greenways, trails, ecological restoration, urban storm-water solutions, and conservation planning. Previously, Hesseldenz managed the McCloud River Preserve for The Nature Conservancy for 10 years and worked for California Trout for 7 years (2 as the executive director). He also founded the Siskiyou Land Trust and was a founding board member and past president of the Mount Shasta Trail Association.

A $5 donation is requested from the attendees and is a “first-come, first-served basis. Donations help fund the museum’s ability to “Illuminate the past, present, and future of the Mount Shasta Region.”

Mt. Shasta Sisson Museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Check the website at www.mtshastamuseum.com, go to the museum’s Facebook page, or call the museum at (530) 926-5508 for more details. The Mt. Shasta Sisson Museum is an all-volunteer, non-profit organization. It is located at 1 North Old Stage Road.