The benefits of the high precipitation totals and spring rains has been a delayed start to the fire season in California and high reservoir levels, even as water is sent to points south.

In a weather anomaly verified for the first time, a weather station in Siskiyou County recorded the highest annual precipitation for California’s weather season.

The weather station at Stouts Meadow, located at an elevation of 5,400 near the headwaters of the McCloud River, recorded 126.76 inches of precipitation for the season. The federal Bureau of Reclamation operates the station.

The record number overshadowed the 122.2 inches recorded at the No. 2 site, the Venado station operated by the Department of Water Resources and located on a ridge north of Armstrong Redwoods State Park. That is near the Russian River, which received epic flooding in February.

The weather year ended Wednesday, measured from Aug. 1 through July 31 for the State of California, and includes many oddities both local and statewide for precipitation, lake levels and a delayed start to the fire season. Precipitation numbers include both rain and the amount of water measured in snowfall.

In Siskiyou County, many stations reported two to four times the levels of rain and snow compared to the winter of the year before.

In downtown Mt. Shasta, a DWR station record 47.42 inches this past winter, more than double the previous year’s 19.48 inches.

Several stations in the surrounding mountains posted double the numbers than Mt. Shasta: At Scott Mountain, where runoff feeds the Scott River, a Reclamation station recorded 89.60 inches; at McCloud Dam, a PG&E station recorded 81.95 inches, and at Girard Ridge above Dunsmuir, a Reclamation station recorded 81.68 inches.

Other numbers of note include 79.50 inches at Mumbo in the Trinity-Divide and 71 inches at Medicine Lake, both by stations operated by the Bureau of Reclamation.

California’s north coast usually records the highest rain totals each year. Instead, Stouts Meadow and Venado were 1-2, followed by three stations in the Feather River Watershed, Four Trees (118.34), Bucks Lake (104.06), and Strawberry Valley (103.45), all operated by DWR.

The highest recorded on state’s north coast was at Honeydew on the Mattole River, called “The Lost Coast,” where a DWR station recorded 102.80 inches.

The benefits of the high precipitation totals and spring rains has been a delayed start to the fire season in California and high reservoir levels, even as water is sent to points south.

As of July 21, the latest numbers available, only 21,400 acres had burned in California, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. Last year, the state had a record 1.89 million acres burn.

At mid-week, many of the north state’s biggest reservoirs were at their highest levels in a generation for Aug. 1. Shasta Lake, the state’s biggest reservoir, was at 89 percent full, 124 percent of normal. Other significant reports include giant Trinity Lake at 91 percent full, 113 percent of normal, and Whiskeytown Lake, the site of last year’s Carr Fire, at 100 percent.

Volunteers at TomStienstra.com provide the Mount Shasta Herald’s weather box, “Verified Weather.”