In a shorter than usual meeting on Monday, the Mount Shasta City Council discussed and voted on several agenda items, including the allotment of funds from Measure A, a potential franchise agreement with Cal-Ore services, and the dispersal of funds through a recently awarded Fire Assistance Grant.

In a shorter than usual meeting on Monday, the Mount Shasta City Council discussed and voted on several agenda items, including the allotment of funds from Measure A, a potential franchise agreement with Cal-Ore services, and the dispersal of funds through a recently awarded Fire Assistance Grant.

Measure A

Finance Director Muriel Howarth-Terrell gave a report on Measure A, a tax initiative voted in by the city of Mount Shasta in 1994. This initiative set a special assessment of $8 per year for unimproved acres of land, $24 a year for improved lots, and $36 a year for commercial lots for the purpose of providing funding for fire department equipment.

The council unanimously voted to adopt a resolution which authorizes assessments for the 2019-2020 year.

Deputy City Clerk Kathy Wilson gave a presentation regarding a new city grant under the Volunteer Fire Assistance program. The grant has a 50/50 match, with $8,920 coming from the state. An equal match would come from the city from the funds collected from Measure A, said Wilson.

The council unanimously approved a resolution to allow the fire department to update its equipment, vehicles, and tools.

“If we need new fire equipment, we need to do this,” said councilor Paul Engstrom. The other councilors agreed.

Cal-Ore

The City of Mount Shasta has been using the high speed fiber optic services of Cal-Ore for several years.

At this time, Cal-Ore does not have a franchise agreement with the city.

Its services require installation, operation, and maintenance of power poles and other related city facilities.

While Cal-Ore doesn’t currently offer residential services, a few concerned citizens said they were worried about what faster, higher speed internet would mean for the citizens of the city.

Melinda Willey said she’s concerned about 5G and its effects on small cities and individuals.

“Technology is changing every six months; 5G is a slippery slope,” Willey said.

She went on to plead with the council to wait and re-think the topic to protect the community and the environment.

Engstrom and councilor John Stackfleth motioned to push the Cal-Ore agenda item to another meeting, so the council can conduct research about the company and all services it offers.