A resident at a home in the 200 block of Quincy Avenue reported a break-in by a white male wielding a gun, said California Highway Patrol Lt. Commander Kevin Luntey.

What was initially thought to be a hostage situation in McCloud last week was a false alarm and ended with the reporting party being taken into protective custody.

Law enforcement was alerted to the situation just after 7 a.m., said Siskiyou County Sheriff Jon Lopey.

A resident at a home in the 200 block of Quincy Avenue reported a break-in by a white male wielding a gun, said California Highway Patrol Lt. Commander Kevin Luntey.

“The victim said that he just woke up and thought he saw someone with a gun in his home,” said Luntey.

Siskiyou County Sheriff Sergeant Ben Whetstine and Deputy Mike Burns secured the scene, cordoned off the street and evacuated nearby houses with the help of the CHP.

Lopey said his department contacted the victim, who said the intruder was still in the house.

“So we had to assume he was still armed, said Lopey. Law enforcement then created a perimeter around the home, evacuated surrounding residences and formulated a plan of action with the CHP."

With the help of CHP K-9 units, they “made a dynamic entry into the house” and cleared the home, determining there was no intruder, Lopey said.

“Upon further investigation, took the reporting party into protective custody because we felt he was under distress and a possible danger to himself and maybe others,” said Lopey.

McCloud resident John Dutton says that he heard the police calling out orders on a bullhorn just after 7 am. “I saw them all dressed up in their protective SWAT gear – it was serious.”

K-9 units were officer Justin Haynes from the Redding CHP office and Officer Collin Lowry from the Mount Shasta CHP office.