Over the past two decades, Bachmann has worked with Forest Service geologists to increase our understanding of the role that glaciers play in debris flows on Mt. Shasta.

On Thursday, Oct. 3, at 7 p.m., Steve Bachmann will give a presentation at Mt. Shasta Sisson Museum entitled, “Mt. Shasta’s Glaciers.”

Bachmann is a hydrologist with the United States Department of Agriculture. He became involved in studying glaciers when he investigated the 2014 Mud Creek and 1997 Whitney Glacier debris flows. Over the past two decades, Bachmann has worked with Forest Service geologists to increase our understanding of the role that glaciers play in debris flows on Mt. Shasta.

Bachmann gave more details about his presentation, “Scientists study glaciers to learn how they change over time and to increase our understanding of the factors that affect the formation, development and decay of glaciers. Scientists have a wide array of tools available to them to assist their efforts including cameras, satellite imagery, ice cores, and field surveying techniques. The results of this work can inform studies on how glaciers are changing in response to changing climate, and how changes in glacier volume are affecting ocean currents, sea levels, and ecosystems that have evolved with them.

“Mt. Shasta’s glaciers have been viewed as bucking the worldwide glacial shrinking trend over the past several decades. I’ll be talking about how this came about and updating the audience on what the more recent science is showing. Glaciers are never static. They’re always growing or shrinking!”

This event is part of a series of talks about this area and the suggested $5 donation is a fundraiser for Mt. Shasta Sisson Museum.

The Mt. Shasta Sisson Museum is a tax-exempt, non-profit organization with an all-volunteer staff that installs new exhibits to share the stories of the Mount Shasta area for its community members and visitors. It is located at 1 North Old Stage Road.

In October, Mt. Shasta Sisson Museum hours will be Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.