Producer and director Kathy Roselli from K-Rose Productions has been working on “Way to Go,” a short documentary focusing on the highest working composting toilet in the U.S. which happens to be on Mt. Shasta, owned by the Sierra Club Foundation, and maintained by a committed group of local volunteers and dedicated Horse Camp caretaking staff during the summer.

When Becky Oberg’s Weed Elementary School students stepped off the bus at Bunny Flat on Sept. 25, they were met by the Horse Camp Education Program’s director Rebeca Franco and by cameras handled by a film crew tagging along on the field trip.

Producer and director Kathy Roselli from K-Rose Productions has been working on “Way to Go,” a short documentary focusing on the highest working composting toilet in the U.S. which happens to be on Mt. Shasta, owned by the Sierra Club Foundation, and maintained by a committed group of local volunteers and dedicated Horse Camp caretaking staff during the summer.

“The film will touch on the history, working, maintenance and use of the facility with a focus on the volunteers (it takes a village) who keep it up and running,” said Roselli. “One of the key messages is the need to respect and care for our outdoor environments.”

Roselli and her team were eager to film the orientation students received about the composting toilet and then to interview them about their experiences using the facility. Students generally notice the scent of wood shavings. When Franco later visits schools after field trips, she always asks students to describe what was best about their day. Several often say the “composting toilet.”

In the early spring, the team also interviewed participants of the Climb Against the Odds, an annual fund- raising climb up on Mt. Shasta that supports breast cancer research and treatment.

"Way to Go" is scheduled to be completed by the end of the year.  Roselli has been producing a film a year since 2012, which have been shown in film festivals around the country. Her most recent film, “Sheep Seasons,” was recently screened at Flixx Fest in Fort Jones. 

Roselli lived outside of Weed for 18 years and was a pediatric physical therapist and Director of Therapy Services at Mercy Mt. Shasta for five years.  She is currently living in Ashland, Oregon.

“I re-invented myself in retirement as a film maker. Some people learn to throw pots. I like to make films,” said Roselli.

For more information about the Sierra Club Foundation’s Horse Camp Education Program contact Franco at shastahorsecamp@gmail.com. Check out the K-Rose Productions website for news about Roselli’s current and past film projects.