Weed Police Department’s soon-to-be chief Justin Mayberry, along with three other WPD officers, said they responded to the medical call on Jackson Street, which was reported by a neighbor who saw Iris Maday on the ground being attacked by two pit bulls.

The Weed City Council voted unanimously after a somber public hearing on Thursday that two dogs who attacked a woman on Sept. 9 will be euthanized.

Weed Police Department’s soon-to-be chief Justin Mayberry, along with three other WPD officers, said they responded to the medical call on Jackson Street, which was reported by a neighbor who saw Iris Maday on the ground being attacked by two pit bulls. Maday was taken to Mercy Medical Center Mt. Shasta for treatment.

The neighbor, Paul Payne, said he was forced to use a 2x4 to separate one of the dogs from Maday.

Mayberry said one of the two dogs had expired licensing, and after the attack, City of Weed Animal Control took possession of the dogs. Documents were sent to the victim, witnesses, and the owner stating the intent to euthanize the dogs, due to the severity of the attack.

Dog owner David Wilson attended the hearing in an attempt to save his dogs. He said he wasn’t home when the incident occurred, but they were home with his fiancee.

“The animals are young, they were scared,” Wilson told the council. The youngest of the two dogs, which was 4 months old, was not yet old enough to receive vaccinations, Wilson said.

“I apologize to those affected,” said Wilson. “I wasn’t there, and it was a terrible and unfortunate accident.”

Maday spoke about her experience in detail. She told the council that the dogs ran at her and her small dog. She said she was holding her dog as one of the pit bulls “locked on her arm.” The other dog then jumped on her back and bit her shoulder, Maday said. The two dogs hen attacked her smaller dog once she was on the ground.

Since the attack, her dog has had two surgeries, Maday said, and she has had multiple surgeries, “multiple rabies shots” and tests.

“I thought I was going to die,” she said. “All I could do was scream.”

Some of Maday’s neighbors said the dogs had acted in a vicious manner on previous occasions. Neighbor Karen Keating said the attack occurred near a day care and worried that the next victim could be a child.

Mayor Ken Palfini asked Mayberry if there had been prior complaints about the animals. Mayberry said that there had been calls about them getting loose.

Councilor Sue Tavalero talked about a similar circumstance that she was involved with a few years ago, where she “did what you aren’t supposed to do,” and got between the attacking dog and her own.

“It’s not the dog’s fault,”

Tavalero said. “A dog is only as smart as you make them,” and pet owners need to be responsible for their animals.

This is the second animal attack Mayberry has been involved with in the past in five years. “The other involved a dog who had killed another dog,” he said.

At the end of the hearing, the council voted somberly but unanimously to uphold the decision by law enforcement and animal control to euthanize the dogs.