Criss is the fourth generation to live in his family’s Macdoel farm, which is where he grew up. His oldest son attends Lassen College. His 16 year old daughter is poised to graduate from Butte Valley High School where his wife, Kerry, works as a teacher. Their youngest son, Mark, is 7.

Brandon Criss said he feels connected with the residents in all of the towns he represents in Siskiyou County’s Supervisoral District 1 – no small feat, considering its large geographic area.

It’s not unusual to see Criss at a meeting in Tulelake one day, then at a cleanup event in McCloud the next. And Criss, who makes his home in Macdoel, said he wants to continue in his role as supervisor for a third term. He’ll face environmental consultant Angelina Cook of McCloud in the March 3 election.

Criss ran successfully in 2012 against then-incumbent Jim Cook. During the course of his two terms, Criss said he’s learned that the entrepreneurial spirit creates opportunities for people to be employed in Siskiyou County and provide for their families. Therefore, he works hard to support businesses and keep the local economy rolling.

For example, he called attention to the recent success of a Siskiyou County lawsuit against activists who wanted to raise Klamath Lake levels to improve suckerfish population. Criss noted that according to studies, the water level didn’t correlate to larger numbers of suckerfish – a decline in population is instead due to the predatory non-native fish that have been introduced to Klamath Lake in recent decades.

The county’s “strategic litigation” in this case prevented a disaster for the economy in the Tulelake Basin, Criss said, and supported farmers who need water.

Criss said that eight years ago, Siskiyou County had an unemployment rate that hovered around 10 percent. He compared that to November’s unemployment, which was five percent. While the decrease in unemployment mirrors the national trend, Criss said Siskiyou County isn’t just riding on the coattails of the state and nation – he said Siskiyou County’s statewide ranking in terms of unemployment has leapfrogged other counties and Siskiyou is now ranked 43rd.

Criss called attention to the success he and other county leaders had in averting a shut-off of the City of Montague’s water during the drought year of 2014, when the Lake Shastina levels were low.

“We got everyone together and we were able to work out a plan,” he said.

Criss also pointed to the importance of county leaders managing tax revenue wisely, something Criss said the board has done successfully for the past eight years.

“During difficult times we have always been able to balance the budget,” he said, which is more than $100 million. The general fund alone is approximately $37 million.

Criss said he’s proud that the current board of supervisors is investing in preventative programs that will benefit the county in years to come. For example, they’re investing in a new jail, which is a “huge financial undertaking,” as well as preventative programs for incarcerated people and Medicated Assisted Treatment, better known as MAT, to help people succeed in recovering from opioid addiction.

Criss is the fourth generation to live in his family’s Macdoel farm, which is where he grew up. His oldest son attends Lassen College. His 16 year old daughter is poised to graduate from Butte Valley High School where his wife, Kerry, works as a teacher. Their youngest son, Mark, is 7.

The Siskiyou Daily News will run profiles of all Supervisoral candidates in the upcoming weeks. They include Criss’s opponent Cook; as well as District 4 candidates Catherine Gilbert and Nancy Ogren; and District 2 incumbent Ed Valenzuela (see page A2) and his opponent Paul Beck.