In his quest to return American to a state of kindness prioritized above issue or politics, LeTourneau is running for Congress in California's District 1, taking on incumbent Congressman Doug LaMalfa, as well as Democratic candidates Audrey Denney and Rob Lydon and fellow Independent Gregory Cheadle.

McCloud’s Joseph LeTourneau believes the way to build our culture is “by serving and empowering people before politics.”

In his quest to return America to a state of kindness prioritized above issue or politics, LeTourneau is running for Congress in California’s District 1, taking on incumbent Congressman Doug LaMalfa, as well as Democratic candidates Audrey Denney and Rob Lydon and fellow Independent Gregory Cheadle.

District 1 includes Siskiyou County was well as the counties of Butte, Lassen, Modoc, Plumas, Shasta, Sierra and Tehama and parts of Glenn, Nevada and Placer counties.

The top two vote-getters in the March 3 primary, regardless of political party, will move on to the general election on Nov. 3.

LeTourneau refers to the small but thriving town of McCloud as an example of how to rebuild our culture.

“The McCloud community has come together to make it come alive with events, and businesses that are drawing people in to bring more revenue into town,” he said. “We want to build people and families from the bottom up and not just rely on laws to do the work for us. We all have something in our hands – whether time, talents, or treasures that can be sown into society. We can continue to create that liberty without overreaching with legislation on social or economic issues.”

A family man, LeTourneau, age 38, has strong family values. He has worked with the Dutton Foundation in some of the most impoverished countries in Africa and the Middle East, focusing on interaction with local leaders and leadership development with youths. He and his wife, Destiny, have seven children; the two oldest were adopted from Ethiopia. Their children range from 22 years old to a newborn who joined the family on Dec. 29. On the wall in the family room is a framed copy of the Declaration of Independence.

“Family is so important, and should go beyond the walls of our homes,” LeTourneau said. “That kind of family-oriented community used to be more prevalent but is still found in small towns like McCloud. We want to restore family culture in a way that doesn’t just rely on raising taxes but cultivates a spirit of generosity; it is a place of belonging and seeing the best in one another instead of this hate-filled turning on one another. There is a way forward of rebuilding our culture and putting people before politics again.

I think that is what many people are ready for. Everyone has a part and everyone has something to give, but we have to be empowered to do so, and we have to choose it.”

LeTourneau said he feels like government has become overtaken by politics.

“There’s a huge divide between sides; but what if that dividing line used to be the path forward before we turned on one another?” he said. “We end up seeing each other’s worst instead of working together, and it’s leaking into everyday culture. We have to change our vision to move forward and get past the arguments that are pulling us sideways and find a common sense solution.”

LeTourneau said his focus is to “get past the issues and heal culture.”

“It is not all black and white or cut and dry,” he said. “Look at what is the motive and agenda behind a bill rather than just a partisan perspective.”

While LeTourneau currently works as Loggers’ basketball coach, last year he taught an emerging young leadership development project called Culture Purple to empower youths and help to find their purpose.

To find out more about LeTourneau, go to his website: letourneauforhouse.com or on his candidate Facebook page: Joseph LeTourneau.