The felling and removal the thinned trees through a timber sale is the first phase of implementation to increase forest resiliency to insects, disease and wildfire in the plantations and wildland urban interface next to town.

Fuel reduction work and forest thinning is set to begin this week along Everitt Memorial Highway on the McBride Plantations Project.

Contract crews for the Shasta McCloud Management Unit of the Shasta-Trinity National Forest will be working in the vicinity of the Gateway Trailhead and McBride Springs Campground on both sides of Everitt Memorial Highway, according to a press release. The felling and removal the thinned trees through a timber sale is the first phase of implementation to increase forest resiliency to insects, disease and wildfire in the plantations and wildland urban interface next to town.

Additional fuel reduction, as well as windrow redistribution, will occur in subsequent phases, the release adds.

Travelers and the recreating public need to be aware of personnel, equipment and large trucks that will be working near or entering roadways, and exercise caution when travelling along the highway. Portions of the Gateway Trail may be closed during the week when logging operations are in the area.

Logging trucks and equipment will be using the One Mile Road (40N88X, behind the locked gate at the Gateway Trailhead) and other roads within the plantations, the Forest Service said. Information will be posted at the trailhead when operations are occurring within the vicinity of the trails.

“I find this particularly important in this well-used area of our forest and its proximity to Mount Shasta City,” said Forest Supervisor Scott Russell. “The project area is close to town and is well used by members of the community. The public can expect the area to look different after project activities are completed. Project thinning activities will reduce tree densities, so the stands will be more open.”

Reduced tree densities will decrease the competition between trees, allowing remaining trees to better use resources. These trees are expected to have an increased capacity to respond to, and more effectively withstand, natural disturbances, such as drought, insects, or wildfire, according to the release

For more information call or stop by the Mount Shasta Ranger Station located at 204 West Alma, Mount Shasta. You ca also call (530) 926-4511 or visit www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=53099