“Into the Unknown” is described as “a very powerful and heartfelt exhibit of sculpture and prints” which “explores the experience of setting off into the unknown in life, whether through physical displacement or through psychologically venturing into the unknown.”

Next month’s Second Saturday art opening and reception at Siskiyou Arts Museum on March 14 will feature the work of mother and daughter artists Kristin Lindseth and Karrina Gomez.

“Into the Unknown” is described as “a very powerful and heartfelt exhibit of sculpture and prints” which “explores the experience of setting off into the unknown in life, whether through physical displacement or through psychologically venturing into the unknown.”

An opening reception will be held Saturday, March 14 from 5 to 7 p.m. The exhibit will continue in SAM’s Museum Space through Saturday, May 2.

Lindseth is an internationally exhibiting sculptor, printmaker and educator who lives and works in the south San Francisco Bay Area, according to a SAM press release.

“Her work is known for her intensely felt sculptures of the interior human landscape, and has been represented in over 100 exhibitions regionally, nationally and internationally,” according to the release.

She will be showing sculpture and intaglio prints in this exhibit. Intaglio refers to a design or figure that is carved, incised, or engraved into a hard material so that it is below the surface, the museum explained.

In her artist’s statement, Lindseth talked about the concept of home as shelter, security, belonging, “connection with a past through generations (and) common ground with friends and family.”

“What is it like when home is elsewhere and there is no possibility of return?” Lindseth said. “Without connections to community, culture and family, what is our sense of who we are in the world? It should be every person’s right to have a home and a place to belong.”

Lindseth is an instructor of art in sculpture, digital art, drawing, and life drawing at Mission College and at the Triton Museum of Art, both in Santa Clara. She is also a member of the International Sculpture Society, Pacific Rim Sculptors, and Nordic Five Arts. She earned a BA from the University of Oregon, in Eugene, Oregon and an MA from San Jose State University. Her studies included a year spent studying painting in Paris at the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts, and art history at the University of Paris, Sorbonne.

Lindseth’s daughter, Karinna Gomez, will also be showing intaglio prints in this exhibit. Gomez is a visual artist living in Anchorage, Alaska where she currently manages a nonprofit gallery. She earned a BA from Northwestern University in art theory and practice in 2009 and an MFA from the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 2014.

Gomez’s prints were included in three New Prints exhibitions at the International Print Center New York, as well as other national exhibitions. She was an artist in residence at Women’s Studio Workshop in Rosendale, New York and Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass Village, Colorado. She has received several awards, including a Fulbright Grant to Iceland and a Rasmuson Foundation Individual Artist Award.

“I began making mezzotints in 2009 when I was living in Iceland for a year, and from the beginning, the darkness achieved through the intaglio technique of mezzotint captivated me,” said Gomez in her artist statement. “I like to think that this series of work conveys a vision of vast space and the strange beauty I’ve encountered in northern places.”

SAM is a member and volunteer supported nonprofit art gallery and gift shop, located at 5824 Dunsmuir Avenue in Dunsmuir. For more information, stop in or call (530) 235-4711, follow SAM on Facebook, or go to www.siskiyouartsmuseum.org.