The surveys are a part of the statewide California Cooperative Snow Survey program, which helps the state forecast the quantity of water available for agriculture, power generation, recreation, and stream flow releases later in the year.

Recent warm temperatures and lack of new snow since February surveys have left current snowpack conditions less than 50% of seasonal averages.

According to results from the Mt. Shasta Area snow survey, snowpack is at 49% of historic average. The average stands at 38 inches of snow at the sampled courses, compared to last year’s 115.3 inches, and the historic average of 76.4 inches.

Snow Water Equivalent (SWE, a measure of water content) was similarly low, at 48% of average. SWE was measured at 48 inches, compared to last year’s 39.8 inches and the historic average of 29.3 inches.

Data for the survey was collected between Feb. 24 and March 3 at Horse Camp, Sand Flat, Sweetwater, Parks Creek and Deadfall Lakes.

The McCloud watershed showed snow depth averaging at 32 inches, compared to last year’s 95.75 and a historic average of 70.3 inches.

The McCloud watershed snowpack sits at 46% of average and SWE of 50% of average, the survey shows. Courses measured for the McCloud watershed include Brewer Creek and Stouts Meadow.

The surveys are a part of the statewide California Cooperative Snow Survey program, which helps the state forecast the quantity of water available for agriculture, power generation, recreation, and stream flow releases later in the year.

Snow surveys are conducted monthly during the winter and spring months by Forest Service employees.

The height of snow and SWE are measured by a snow sampling tube with a cutter end that is driven through the snow pack, measuring depth. The snow core is then weighed to determine the water content. The information is forwarded to the State of California, where the data is compiled with other snow depth reports and becomes part of the California Cooperative Snow Surveys program. The data is managed by the California Department of Water Resources.

For more information and historical data, visit the Department of Water Resources at http://cdec.water.ca.gov/snow/ or call Marcus Nova, Natural Resource Specialist, at (530) 926-9606.