The Siskiyou County Sheriff’s office received a report at approximately 11:30 p.m. on Monday that Frankie Gutierrez, 22, may have injured his shoulder and had become separated from his friends.

A Los Angeles man who became injured while snowboarding on May 4 was rescued the following morning after spending a cold lonely night outdoors.

The Siskiyou County Sheriff’s office received a report at approximately 11:30 p.m. on Monday that Frankie Gutierrez, 22, may have injured his shoulder and had become separated from his friends.

The SCSO’s Search and Rescue Team’s coordinator, Deputy Mike Burns, initiated a multi-agency search and in the early morning hours of Tuesday, May 5, Burns requested assistance from the California Highway Patrol’s Northern Division Air Operations Unit. An H-14 responded and utilized a FLIR (forward looking infrared radar), which is a thermographic camera that senses infrared radiation, such as heat generated by a human body. However, the missing man was not located, the SCSO reported.

Just before 8:15 a.m. Gutierrez was located and rescued from the mountain by SCSO SAR responders, with assistance from United States Forest Service climbing ranger, Ryan Sorenson.

Gutierrez, had climbed with others to a level at or above 10,000 feet and attempted to snowboard down the mountain, the SCSO said. Due to the rugged terrain and weather conditions be became separated from his companions. He was located near Horse Camp, at about 7500 feet elevation.

“The man was unhurt, but he was cold, hungry, and exhausted as a result of his ordeal,” said Burns. “The SAR team and USFS climbing ranger did a good job under difficult circumstances to rescue the lost snowboarder and we are all relieved he was found alive and uninjured.”

Currently, no climbing on Mount Shasta is authorized above the 10,000 feet elevation level due to the COVID-19 emergency, SCSO said. When climbing is reinstated above the 10,000 feet level, Wilderness Permits and Summit Passes are required.

Additional Mount Shasta climbing information may be obtained by contacting the Mt. Shasta Ranger Station at (530) 926-4511, or, the Climbing Hotline at 530-926-9613.

Additional information may be obtained by visiting the Shasta-Trinity National Forest homepage.

Siskiyou County Sheriff Jon Lopey commended the team and reminded climbers to adhere to climbing restrictions. He encouraged potential climbers to be fully prepared for the experience.

“Planning and preparation are essential and can be maximized by consulting with the proper USFS experts,” Lopey said. “There are also experienced private climbing vendors available.”