I tell them to imagine trying to hit a ball with their hands stiff and rigid. You just don't. We all hinge our hands naturally, like when using a hammer to pound a nail into a piece of wood.

Teaching lessons in Pebble Beach, sharing the game of golf with so many and helping them play better was one of the best times in my life. It didn’t matter where my students came from, we all shared the ability to play better golf and most importantly, have more fun with the game.
I am often asked the question: what should my hands do on the back swing? Do I hinge my hands or  keep them stiff with no hinging? What do I do when I take the club back?
I always like the questions and I say to my students, “have you ever played baseball and hit a baseball with the bat?” Most say sure, they played a little baseball.
 I tell them to imagine trying to hit a ball with their hands stiff and rigid. You just don’t. We all hinge our hands naturally, like when using a hammer to pound a nail into a piece of wood.
Next time you’re getting in some practice, take your stance, get your grip on the club and as you make your back swing, hinge your hands as you take the club away on the back swing, forming an L with the shaft of the club pointing straight up to the sky. This is only a partial, or half golf swing, not a full swing.
This will feel a little different at first but hinging your hands allows  the golf club to create power to hit the golf ball further..
If you can look at yourself in a mirror at home doing this drill it will give you a visual of the motion. Remember, a picture is worth a thousand words.
Practice this until you feel comfortable with the hinging of the hands, forming the L for
Ben Alexander is a PGA teaching professional who formerly taught in Pebble Beach Calif. and now teaches golf lessons at Lake Shastina Golf Course. He was awarded the PGA Teacher of the Year twice and also nominated for National PGA Teacher of the Year. To contact Ben call (831) 277-9001.