One of the great attributes of the game of golf is having the opportunity to meet a variety of people and create new and long lasting friendships.

I have been teaching golf in Northern California for almost 50 years and have made some good friends along the way.
One of the great attributes of the game of golf is having the opportunity to meet a variety of people and create new and long lasting friendships.
For example, a young man named Fred Breining called for a lesson one day when I was teaching at Dry Creek Golf Club a few miles south of Sacramento. He explained that he was a relief pitcher for the San Francisco Giants and had just been introduced to golf, and that he had a big slice.
 I saw Fred the next day and he did have a  big “banana slice.”  For a right handed golfer, the ball starts way left and ends up way right. I could see immediately that Fred was a good athlete and it would not take long to get him on the right path.
All I did was teach Fred to grip his driver a bit softer, relax his arms and shoulders, and allow his forearms to rotate so the clubface would close through impact. The result was almost instant. Fred began hitting a nice little draw with his driver and we became friends forever.
 A few weeks later, I taught him to hit bunker shots and work on his short game. Next thing I knew, I had tickets for Giants baseball games. I never requested tickets, someone would call and tell me to pick them up at will-call.
Another student of mine was visiting Mount Shasta Resort and requested golf lessons for himself and his family. They were on vacation from Austria. Their first lessons were seven years ago. Now they return every two years for more lessons. They finally have their own clubs and travel around Europe, playing golf when they can. They are also expert skiers and snowboarders, but I only see them during our summer months.    One more student of mine and his wife came here to Mount Shasta for a vacation from Alaska. John was a fishing guide up in Kodiak and had a golf simulator in his basement.
 He had never played on a real golf course until we met. I gave John and his wife five lessons on the practice range at the Resort. A few days later, we actually played nine holes of golf and they had a blast. John was sure he had never lost a golf ball on his simulator, but he sure lost his share playing Mount Shasta Resort.
They will be back in July.

Rod Sims is the PGA Teaching Professional at Mount Shasta Resort. He would love to hear from you and he can be reached at (209) 329-5634.