Editorial: Remembering Tim Russert

Staff Writer
Mount Shasta Herald

When the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum opened three years ago, it sought to pull Lincoln’s presidency out of the history books and drop it into a modern context.

Among the exhibits that does that in stellar fashion is “Campaign 1860,” which sets the four-way presidential campaign of 1860 in a modern media setting. Setting viewers straight on the views of candidates Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, John C. Breckinridge and John Bell is the familiar, authoritative presence of Tim Russert.

Russert was a natural choice for this role. Since taking the helm of “Meet the Press” in December 1991, Russert had earned respect across the political spectrum. If a generation was to understand the bitterly contested presidential contest of 1860, who better to explain it than the man who guided America through the bitterly contested presidential contest of 2000?

“Campaign 1860” also appeared to have staying power. Russert, after all, was at the top of his game when the exhibit was unveiled. In fact, his participation was a tightly guarded secret prior to the museum’s opening.

We assumed his stature would only grow as he worked presidential debates and elections in the years to come.

His loss last week was a truly sad moment for anyone who followed national politics in America. It’s our hope that “Campaign 1860” remains part of the presidential museum for many years to come. It’s a fitting tribute to one of this generation’s great journalists — a person millions will miss as the current presidential campaign unfolds.

State Journal-Register