Wesak presenters deliver message of hope for the future

Steve Gerace
Carolyn Ford and her crystal skull “Einstein,” during her Saturday evening presentation at Wesak 2012 in the Sisson Gymnasium in Mount Shasta. Ford said the skull is an ancient artifact that she kept without speaking about it in public for 20 years -- until the 10/10/10 crystal skull event in New York City. Now she is sharing the 33 pound skull and spreading a message of knowing yourself and loving yourself. "Love is the all access pass," she said during an interview before taking the stage. Ford is scheduled to give another Wesak presentation Sunday from 6 to 7:15 p.m.

In a time when the most basic of crystals is being used to transform and accelerate electronic communication around the world and beyond, a much larger crystal is drawing attention during Wesak 2012 this weekend in Mount Shasta.

Carolyn Ford, one of the highlighted presenters at Wesak, is in Mount Shasta with "Einstein," a 33 pound crystal skull she describes as an ancient artifact that functions as a "master computer."

Many smaller modern crystal skulls are being manufactured and are becoming "points of light in a crystalline grid around the earth," Ford said during an interview before her Wesak presentation Saturday evening. "The frequency in the shape of a skull is different than other crystals. They're like wi fi antennae sharing a higher vibration energy."

Ford is scheduled to give a final presentation Sunday evening in Mount Shasta, as are other Wesak presenters, including Stephen Mehler, a crystal skull researcher, Egyptologist, and Rosicrucian scientist; and Raymond Tarpey, MA, an historian specializing in Mayan/Aztec research and spirituality and Edgar Cayce.

The three agree that the year 2012 is significant as an entrance to "a new phase of consciousness," as Mehler said before his Saturday presentation. And they are all delivering a message of hope for the future.

"Anything that works to bring people together is important to me," said Mehler.

"It's about networking spiritually," said Tarpey, who was educated in China and at St. Johns University, has lived in both China and Japan and "consulted their ancient records."

"I don't believe, I study," he said, noting that the Mayans were able to develop their sophisticated calendar because "they were great searchers of the natural world."

Tarpey says more people are interested in that networking than ever before. "We have enough believers," he said. “We need more studiers.”

Mehler said that interest is developing because people are realizing "their religions have failed them, academics have failed them, and governments have failed them."

Along with the presentations, Wesak includes a vendors area in the old Sisson School gymnasium organized by Barry David of Mount Shasta, who has a large booth of his own promoting "gem essences" he creates using local Mt. Shasta-area materials.

Carolyn Ford and her crystal skull “Einstein,” during her Saturday evening presentation at Wesak 2012 in the Sisson Gymnasium in Mount Shasta. Ford said the skull is an ancient artifact that she kept without speaking about it in public for 20 years -- until the 10/10/10 crystal skull event in New York City. Now she is sharing the 33 pound skull and spreading a message of knowing yourself and loving yourself. "Love is the all access pass," she said during an interview before taking the stage. Ford is scheduled to give another Wesak presentation Sunday from 6 to 7:15 p.m.



Stephen Mehler, MA, author of three books and one of the lead presenters at Wesak 2012 in Mount Shasta, talks with fellow presenter Raymond Tarpey Saturday evening in the old Sisson School gymnasium. A crystal skull researcher, Egyptologist, and Rosicrucian research scientist, Mehler said he has tested the crystal skull named Einstein that Carolyn Ford brought to Mount Shasta this weekend. He said he believes it was carved by hand more than 1,000 years ago and functions as a type of computer, storing information and energy. Admitting that "most academic scientists think we're crazy," Mehler said he believes crystal skulls in ancient times "weren't worshipped as gods, but as energy of the divine.” Mehler is scheduled to speak again Sunday from 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Wesak.