Click the link below to go to the weekly auto rail, with car-care tips, Car Q&A with Junior Damato and more. Or check out these links.

Tip of the Week


About 70 percent of vehicles on the road are in need of some repair, according to the National Car Care Council. A recent article from StockMarketsReview.com revealed that 40 percent of consumers involved in repair decisions are postponing car maintenance or repair on their primary vehicle.


To help motorists get and stay safely on the road, AutoZone is offering these tips from Bruce Bonebrake, certified Master Automotive Technician and host of Weekend Mechanic on the DIY network.


- Perform routine scheduled maintenance checks. Motorists should check their owner's manual for a schedule of recommended maintenance intervals from the vehicle manufacturer. If the owner's manual has been lost, many websites, such as the National Car Care Council's web site www.carcare.org, offer a recommended maintenance schedule for vehicles.


- Be proactive. Don't wait for a breakdown to check important car components such as brakes and batteries. Proactive checks and preventative maintenance of these critical car parts can be the difference between staying on the road and being stranded on the roadside.


- Give brakes a checkup. Hazardous road conditions can lead to increased use of antilock braking systems, which can cause premature wear of all brake system components. As temperatures warm up, motorists should check their braking systems to uncover any damage that may have occurred during the winter months.


- Extreme temperatures can mean battery failure. Corrosion caused by heat is the leading cause of battery failure.


- ARA


The List


According to a Yahoo Autos Survey, here are the highest-quality vehicles:


1. Toyota


2. Ford


3. Chevrolet


4. Honda


5. BMW


Did You Know


According to the Society of Automotive Engineers, the most powerful V-8 is in the 2013 Ford Shelby GT500.


Car Q&A


Q: Gasoline today contains 10 percent ethanol, which is one form of alcohol. We all use it now. Does this alcohol content mean that we no longer need to use “dry gas” additives, these things being one kind of alcohol or other?


A: I would not recommend any gas additive at all. There is enough alcohol in the gas we all use today. There are no cleaners that will clean injectors that go into the gas tank. If any of the professional cleaner entered the gas tank it would destroy the coating and the fuel pump along with the filter.


- Junior Damato, Talking Cars columnist


GateHouse News Service