I applaud the Farrelly Brothers for doing a twist with the movie and not making it a biography, but instead making it a “Three Stooges” feature. But it was just plain bad. Not every movie is meant to be great, and this was just one of them.

Growing up a giant “Three Stooges” fan, I couldn’t help but compare and judge the new Farrely Brothers film named for the comedy legends. And I’m sure many Stooge-maniacs did the same.


It was just plain bad. Not every movie is meant to be great, and this was just one of them.


I applaud the Farrelly Brothers for doing a twist with the movie and not making it a biography, but instead making it a “Three Stooges” feature that takes place in present day. That was fun, especially for younger audiences.


But where the movie goes wrong is the overdone and overkill usage of famous “Three Stooges” lines and antics. For a Stooge fan who has read their biography, seen every short and feature and knows a good chunk of those antics and lines, it made the movie predictable. In fact, it was so predictable that it snowballed into a mere movie of boredom.


I would have left, but I paid my $8.25, and in this economy, that’s a lot of money. In just about every scene, in every situation the Stooges got in, I could tell you just before it happened what Moe, Larry or Curly was going to say.


Moe’s famous insults of “chowderhead” and “porcupine” were used way too much. Curly’s barking and “nyuk-nyuk-nyuk” was expected, but every other dumbfounded line the character had in the film seemed like it was thrown in just for the sake of having it in the movie.


Credit to the actors who portrayed the Stooges is deserved. Chris Diamantopoulos, Sean Hayes and Will Sasso did a very good job bringing Moe, Larry and Curly to life. The voices were down pat, facial expressions were perfect and their delivery of the Stooges’ antics was spot on. Sean Hayes was made up amazingly to look like Larry Fine. If anyone looked like a ghost, it was him.


The only problem I had with the actors was Diamantopoulos playing Moe Howard. When the Stooges broke into popularity, Moe Howard was already in his 40s. Diamantopoulos looked too young to play the part for Moe and seemed like he had to work the hardest at pulling off his facial expressions.


What I didn’t understand –– and keep in mind, this is a minor spoiler alert –– is why the script was written with Curly having a pet rat? If the classic “Three Stooges” shorts have taught us anything, it’s that Curly can’t stand tassels and mice. I don’t know if this was an intended flaw by the directors to grab the attention of Stooge fans like me, or if it’s just something they missed. But being a purist, it just didn’t make sense.


There was one little moment (again, minor spoiler alert) where Curly’s rat scurried away in fear. And usually the sound folks on a movie set will throw in a few squeaks, but instead — and keep in mind this happens very quickly — the rat doesn’t run away squeaking, but runs away with the classic stuttered shriek.


But overall, it’s just not appealing. If you were never into the Stooges, didn’t become a Stooge-maniac, but caught a few shorts, you might like it. As a lifelong “Stooge” fan, I just can’t see it from that point of view.