Williamson County remained under an 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew Saturday as crews continued the cleanup after a storm Friday afternoon wreaked havoc on Southern Illinois. A storm the National Weather Service called an "inland hurricane" swept through the region, downing trees and power lines, damaging homes and businesses, and blocking streets and highways. Winds were clocked as high as 106 miles per hour in some locations.

Williamson County remained under an 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew Saturday as crews continued the cleanup after a storm Friday afternoon wreaked havoc on Southern Illinois.

A storm the National Weather Service called an "inland hurricane" swept through the region, downing trees and power lines, damaging homes and businesses, and blocking streets and highways. Winds were clocked as high as 106 miles per hour in some locations.

The storm has claimed one life so far. An official with Southern Illinois Healthcare told River Radio on the air Friday night that one person in the region suffered a storm-related head injury, but did not identify the person who died or where that person was from.

Steve Land, the assistant director of the Williamson County Emergency Management Agency, said he communicated with the county's hospitals. The two hospitals, Heartland Regional Medical Center and Herrin Hospital, report 22 injuries related to the storm.

According to Ron Pate, vice president of regional operations for Ameren Illinois, nearly 65,000 Ameren customers in Southern Illinois were without power. Pate added Saturday afternoon that approximately 6,000 customers did have power restored.

Pate said there were 13 main transmission lines that were downed in the area. He said those lines would have to be restored before the company could work on restoring power to individual customers.

Pate said Ameren was targeting midnight Tuesday for full restoration of power to the region, but cautioned that some individual customers could be without power longer.

Marion Daily Republican